Saving Lives & Property…

NOAA’s National Severe Storms Laboratory serves the nation by working to improve the leadtime and accuracy of severe weather warnings and forecasts in order to save lives and reduce property damage. NSSL scientists are committed to their mission to understand the causes of severe weather and explore new ways to use weather information to assist National Weather Service forecasters and federal, university and private sector partners.

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At NSSL, our basic and applied research focuses on understanding severe weather processes, developing weather observation technology, and improving forecast tools, with emphasis on:

NSSL News

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Introducing Cloud-based Warn-on-Forecast

May 16, 2022

The Warn-on-Forecast System is a research project at the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory that aims to increase lead time for tornado, severe thunderstorm and flash flood warnings. Since its inception in 2009, researchers have…

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Flash floods will increase across the United States, new research suggests

April 26, 2022

New climate modeling research shows heavy rainfall events will cause more frequent and stronger flash floods by the end of the century, especially in the southwest and central United States. NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory…

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Webinar highlights spring research activities at NSSL

March 31, 2022

It’s severe weather season and researchers at the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory are busy taking instruments to the storms, collecting experimental radar data, and collaborating with partners in the NOAA Hazardous Weather Testbed to…

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Making connections between weather and UAS

October 15, 2021

Tony Segalés Espinosa says his love of small-scale aircraft began as a kid, flying model aircraft with his dad. Today, that love transfers into engineering drones for severe weather research.

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Translations and beyond

October 12, 2021

Based on research with SPC forecasters and research with language experts, a researcher recommended a new SPC risk communication scale model in order to improve weather outreach to Spanish-speaking communities.

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Researchers work to gain better understanding of hurricanes

September 27, 2021

When Hurricane Ida moved inland along the Gulf Coast of Louisiana in late August 2021, a team of researchers set out to study winds associated with the damaging storm. The group, including scientists from the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory, captured unique datasets.

NSSL Video

Threats in Motion

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In nature, hazardous weather is almost always in motion. New research and technology are making it possible to provide more continuous information about the storm and its movement. Threats in Motion (TiM) is the next step in the evolution of how weather information is provided to the public. Learn more →

Advanced Technology Demonstrator

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Radar research at the NOAA National Severe Storms Laboratory has taken another step forward. The Advanced Technology Demonstrator is the first full-scale, S-band, dual-polarization phased array radar built from the ground up and designed specifically for use as a weather radar. Learn more →